Month: November 2021

How does one get to Mars?

As we approach the first of the year, the question is whether we will be able to get there before the end of the decade.

The answer depends on the size of the planet and the ability of Earth to survive in a habitable zone, or the area where liquid water is able to exist on the surface.

This article aims to answer that question.

It’s a long story, but we can get to the bottom of the question by focusing on a number of things.

The first is a simple and straightforward question: what is the amount of liquid water on Mars?

How many years would it take for a planet to reach a liquid-water environment?

It would take roughly 2.7 Earth years to reach the point of no return, which is about 7 billion years, but there are a few reasons for thinking this is a pretty conservative number.

First, the planet’s rotation is very slow.

The planet’s orbit around the Sun is around 2.8 years, and its position in the solar system means it takes about 1.5 billion years to orbit the Sun once the planet reaches the same orbital position as the Sun.

Thus, it takes a bit longer to go to a liquid environment.

Second, the surface of Mars is made up mostly of liquid.

Most of the water is trapped in the planet, and it has a thin crust.

But there are other layers of rock and ice that are not so well preserved, so the amount and the duration of time it takes to lose that liquid water will vary.

The second reason for thinking the amount to be realistic is that most of the time that we will have liquid water, the amount will be small.

Finally, it’s important to remember that Mars is not a very hospitable planet, so there’s no guarantee that we’ll be able, over time, to bring the surface water back to a level where it’s still usable.

If you are worried about getting sick, there’s always the possibility of a comet strike that will bring the water back into the atmosphere.

If you think about it, the number that really matters is the time it will take to reach that level.

In the future, the likelihood that we can bring back enough water for the world to live is very high, so we’re going to need to keep working to get that number right.

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