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Caught in a web of corruption: A report into the CBA

AUSTIN (AFP) – A report in the state’s leading newspaper has exposed how the CAA has corrupted its governing body and undermined its independence.

Key points:The report is due to be released later this weekThe CAA is investigating the conduct of its presidentAndrew McLeodThe watchdog’s chairman, Paul Chisholm, has been questioned by the CAB and the AFLCommissioners have told the watchdog they are “deeply concerned” over the matterThe report was compiled by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) in a bid to understand the extent to which CBA is run by political patronage, and to determine whether it is effectively independent.

The watchdog is investigating allegations by former senior AFL commissioner Andrew McLeod that the CSA has been manipulated by political bosses.

Mr McLeod said the CPA was “a cesspool of corruption”.

“It is a political arm of the CFA (Federal Football Association), which is the body that runs the AFL,” he told ABC Radio Melbourne’s AM program on Monday.

“And the CFCA is the political arm, which runs the CDA, which is a separate entity.”

The CBA has confirmed that it is investigating Mr McLeod’s claims.

“The CFA is currently conducting an independent review into the allegations in this matter and will respond to it as soon as possible,” the CCA said in a statement.

“While there is no evidence of a breach of the AFL’s code of conduct, the CTA continues to take appropriate action in response to these allegations.”

We remain committed to the integrity of our football governance process, and the CGA (Football Governance and Accountability Group) has been appointed as an independent body to review the governance of the Australian Football League.

“The report has also been released by the AFL.

Commissioners from both the AFL and CBA have been questioned about the CEA, which oversees the CFL.

Commissioner Paul Chiswick, the AFL chief executive officer, told reporters on Monday he was “deepest troubled” by the report, which he said should be made public.”

I am deeply concerned that the findings in this report may have had a chilling effect on our internal processes, the integrity and independence of the commission and its members, and that this may have been the case for some time,” he said.

Commissionors from both leagues have been interviewed about the allegations.

Commissionor Steve Glynn told reporters the AFL was “not going to be able to accept” the findings.”

What we’re trying to do is get the best information that we can, and I don’t think we have it.

“So we’ll have to see what we do.

It’s too early in the investigation to say that we’ve got a conclusion,” he added.

Commission chief executive Gillon McLachlan said he was deeply concerned about the findings, but had no immediate comment.

“This is a very serious matter, and we’re going to work with our colleagues and the independent auditor on this,” he tweeted.

Commission head of football operations David Noble told the ABC the AFL “is taking this very seriously”.

“The AFL will be taking these matters very seriously,” he reiterated.

“Any suggestion that this process has been compromised is completely wrong.”

Commission chief operating officer John Barker said he had not been told the full extent of the investigation.

“At the moment, we’re not in a position to comment on the specifics of the allegations,” he wrote in a tweet.

“However, it would be inappropriate to comment further until we’ve had a full and frank investigation.”

The AFL has defended its process.

Commission chairman Paul Chiglia said the AFL would take “all necessary steps” to ensure the “independent review” was “rigorous and thorough”.

“We want to make sure that any allegations are thoroughly investigated and fully dealt with,” he was quoted as saying.

“There is no place for political patronage in the AFL.”

Commissioner Ian Chubb said he could not comment on individual matters until the full report was released.

“It’s not for me to make a decision on how the inquiry will proceed, I’m not in the business of doing that,” he later told the Herald Sun.

“But there is absolutely no doubt that this investigation will take time.”

Commission chairman Ian Chibber said the inquiry would “look at all the allegations that have been made”.

“I want to assure the public that I will be doing everything possible to ensure that the inquiry is rigorous and thorough,” he continued.

Commissioning code ‘rigorous’ but “unlikely to be done”Commissioners are to meet in the coming days to discuss the findings and report back on their recommendations.

“Our process is rigorous, we take every allegation seriously and we will be looking at all of the evidence that has been provided,” Commissioner Chisick told reporters.

“If there is evidence to support a recommendation, we will have to look at